How To Care For your Pet Dog

He will be there by your side, as your loving companion – he will offer you protection if ever the need arises. Pet dog owners in turn must know how to look after their pet dog, and be responsible for it. The dog’s needs are simple and easy to follow. When puppies come home they need lots of love and attention. They may stress a little at first, as this is probably the first time they are away from their mother and their littermates. It is important that you begin the process of socialization, generally integrating your new pet into your family and teaching it to relate to people and other animals through gentle play, interaction and having pleasant encounters with family friends and pets

A stress free environment for your puppy

Try and avoid sudden loud noises such as children screaming or doors slamming. Also limit the visitors your new puppy has – gradually allowing it to get used to more and more strange faces.

Provide a warm comfortable bed – or alternatively a cardboard box with many layers of newspaper and a washable blanket on top. Make sure your puppy will still fit into it as it grows. Place the puppy’s bed where you want it to sleep as an adult or grown dog – usually the best place would be a quiet, private corner. For the first few nights – settling period – a fluffy toy and a warm (not hot) water bottle placed beneath the bedding will help. The puppy may be noisy and stresses at night immediately after separation from its littermates. A low radio or ticking clock can help sooth it.

When the puppy is awake during the day – give it lots of body contact and talk to your puppy in a soft voice to express friendship and a gruff voice to express disapproval of any of its unwanted actions.

Keeping your puppy safe

The following are things to consider when preparing for the arrival of a new puppy. Lock away household and garden chemicals.- Make sure electrical cords are out of biting reach.

Be extra careful when using lawnmowers, skateboards, roller blades or any other similar thing.

Make sure the puppy cannot get through’ any swimming pool fencing.

Teaching your puppy the house rules

The newest member of the ‘family pack’ must learn that you are the pack leader and that it is the bottom dog in the pack. Once the new puppy recognizes its place in the family hierarchy it will be happier and easily trained to obey commands. The puppy will look to its pack leader to protect it and make decisions for it.

Nutritional needs

It is best to start by feeding your puppy the same diet it ate before it joined your family. You can introduce any changes slowly over several days to avoid causing digestive upsets. Commercial puppy foods are recommended and later commercial adult food – a well balanced good quality dry food is essential. A constant supply of fresh clean water should be available. A deep stainless steel or earthenware bowl will keep the water cooler and in summer ice can be added to the water.

Play time with your Pet Dog

Puppies love to play and this helps them to grow and learn. In the early days when they play among their littermates, it gives them exercise and is the way in which they compete for their order in the pack. Don’t be rough with your puppy – but it’s also important in these early stages that your puppy learns that family members are dominant. Chewing helps puppies through teething – but it is also a way of investigating their environment. This need is easily satisfied with chewable objects and toys. Make sure they don’t resemble objects that you don’t want chewed, for example how does the puppy distinguish between his old shoe and all of the other shoes in the household?

Puppy Dog Potty Training

Anticipate toilet needs. Take your puppy outside as soon as it wakes up, as well as before and after every meal. Go right outside with your puppy – this is very important. Take it to a specific area of the garden and wait until it has finished – always praise the puppy afterwards.

The importance of Exercising your Pet Dog

A retractable leash is ideal for a puppy, in this way you can’t force the puppy to over exercise. Adult dogs also need exercise and play – walking a dog everyday is great, or play in the park with a ball or stick. If everyday is too hard to manage, try at least four times a week.

Grooming your Dog

Get your new dog used to being groomed, handled and examined as soon as possible. Your grooming equipment should include a dog brush and comb. Establish a daily routine where you examine your dogs mouth, teeth, eyes, ears, abdomen, paws and other parts of its anatomy, and although it may not need grooming do it anyway. If your dog is regularly groomed you will only need to wash it if it gets really dirty or smelly. It is best to use lukewarm water and give the dog a brush out first. Use a proper dog shampoo and dry it off with its own special dog towel, before it gets cold. Nails should be clipped as needed depending on the breed of the dog and the surface that the dog usually walks on. If it’s a hard surface they walk on the nails will wear down naturally. Special dog nail clippers are available – if you are not confident with this process ask your vet or a dog groomer to show you the process.

Following these simple steps will ensure you, your family and the newest edition to the family will have a happy, healthy and rewarding time together.

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(c) By Katharine Logan, 2005

K9Sky dog daycare software . The most complete kennel software for kennels with booking kennels Management, Task Schedule, Dog Grooming, Detailed Pet Profile.

The Pros and Cons of Having a Ferret For a Pet

My ferrets “dook,” do the war dance, and “skitter” between my feet, and make my husband, kids, and I smile. For my family, ferrets are excellent pets. My husband thinks they’re better than dogs, and the whole lot of us prefer ferrets to cats. Ferrets are very different from cats and dogs, however.Their behavior, smell, motivations, and shape are all different from cats and dogs. They are classified as exotic pets, and it is important that you consider the pros and cons of ferret parenthood before adopting one of these wonderful weasels.

The differences between ferrets and other pets create the pros and cons of having a pet ferret

Intelligence: I hesitate to say that cats and dogs are smarter than ferrets, but I readily acknowledge that ferrets have a significantly different kind of intelligence. Ferrets are pretty good problem solvers. As an example, for Christmas one year, I put an apple in a stocking for my ferret. (The ferret liked to steal apples and hide them. He didn’t actually eat them.) The apple was just a tad smaller in diameter as the stocking. Ernie put his head in the stocking, grabbed the apple, and pulled. It didn’t work. After only two tries he crawled out of the stocking and got on top of it. He pushed the apple out.

Tenacity: Every ferret I have ever seen has been far more tenacious than the most dedicated cat or dog. Ferrets are intensely curious. They must know what is behind closed doors. They must know what is behind a barrier. They need to study the backside of a dishwasher and the inside of a sofa. If a ferret somehow manages to get in your pots and pans cabinet, don’t be surprised to find them later in with your silverware. This tenacity makes it difficult to “ferret proof” and make your house safe for your beloved pets.

Thievery: Dogs tend to steal shoes and socks as puppies, but they outgrow the behavior. Ferrets “steal” throughout their lives. If an object appeals to a ferret, it will snatch that object and hide it in their stash. Ferrets do not grow out of this–humans learn to put up their keys and shoes.

Diet (Input): While dogs are omnivores, ferrets are like cats. They are carnivores. In fact, ferrets are obligate carnivores and they eat meat and fat. Ferrets need ferret food, and ferret food is a little more expensive than cat food.

Output: Ferrets don’t bury their excrement in a litter box. Dogs are easily trained to go outside. Ferrets, on the other hand, generally do their business in corners. While they can be trained to use litter boxes, it’s rare to find a ferret that will walk to another room to use a litter box.

Names: Cats and dogs quickly learn their names and dogs are easily trained to come to their name. Few ferrets know their names. Only two of my ferrets know their names. A woman I know who has operated a ferret shelter for 18 years tells me she has only ever seen one ferret demonstrate knowledge of her name.

Which of these are pros and which are cons? Well, the answer to that question is different for each person.

Before you get a ferret for a pet, ask yourself the following questions.

  1. If your pet ferret steals your keys, is it cute? If your pet ferret steals your keys twenty times, is it still cute?
  2. Are you willing to re-arrange your house to ferret-proof it?
  3. Are you willing to deal with magnetic locks on your cabinets?
  4. Are you willing to get rid of your recliners?
  5. Do you get bent out of shape if the bottoms of your doors have scratch marks on them?
  6. Do you mind cleaning litter boxes?
  7. Do you mind cleaning up areas that aren’t the litter box?
  8. Can you get over a two-foot tall Plexiglas barrier?
  9. Do you have a sensitive nose?
  10. If you leave a glass out, will you mind if it gets tilted over and a nose in it?

It’s not all bad though. As yourself these questions too.

  1. Do you like watching curious animals?
  2. Do you like playing with your animals?
  3. Do you like pets that will play with you and play on their own?
  4. Do you like cute animals?

Ferrets are not for everyone, but they are wonderful for some people

Ferrets can seem chaotic at times, but once you get to know the species, they aren’t.

Are you still considering a pet ferret?

Please visit a ferret shelter close to you and talk with the shelter workers. Besides the fact that almost every ferret shelter is overflowing right now, the shelter people can help you understand a specific ferret’s personality. The shelter people also have a vested interested in doing what it takes to make your home the ferret’s forever home. The American Ferret Association and Ferret Life both have directories for ferret shelters.

Mosquitoes and Pets: Mosquito Pet Protection Basics

Mosquitoes and pets tend not to get along together. It is important that you take steps to protect you pets from mosquitoes this coming spring. That protection begins now because your cats, dogs, rabbits and other pets are just as susceptible to disease from mosquito bites as you are.

Mosquitoes bite to extract your blood – not to feed on, but to use as a source of protein to create their eggs. That’s why only female mosquitoes bite you. Males are quite happy feeding off the nectar they find in the plants around your yard. They have no interest in you whatsoever – unless you are swatting at them when they will fly away. It’s the females that home in on you.

They don’t care if that protein comes from cat blood, dog blood, horse blood or human blood – it’s all the same to them. Just a source of protein that enables them to reproduce. Your pets do not know how to protect themselves, and are relying on you to do it for them. Here’s how!

Mosquitoes and Pets: Mosquito Control Tips for your Pets

The major methods of protecting your pets from mosquitoes center around separation: keep your pets away from mosquitoes. Where your pets are concerned, mosquito control involves keeping them indoors (the pets!) when mosquitoes are most active: early morning and dusk. Tiddles and Bonzo should be safe during hot, sunny days, although mosquitoes can become active in warm weather with a good cloud cover.

This is particularly the case in areas where mosquitoes are swarming. You can expect this close to rivers and creeks, swamp land, marshes and stagnant ponds. This is the type of water where mosquitoes breed, and as the nymphs turn into adults, particularly in early spring, there can be swarms of these insects around their favorite breeding grounds. Keep your pets away from these areas until the swarms die down. Even then be careful – or even better, have these areas treated to control the production of new mosquitoes.

Mosquito Control in Gardens Yards and Shrubbery

Make sure that your garden or yards are clear of any containers that can hold water over the winter. If you have an old buckets or bird baths that have lain over from fall to spring, you can be pretty sure that they will contain mosquito eggs or even hatched nymphs waiting for spring.

Don’t allow this to happen – the remedy is very simple! Remove all such containers from your yard, and check that there are no old pools of standing water, that your guttering is all clean and free-flowing, and that your drains look clean and tidy. These are common places where mosquitoes breed.

Another potential issue, and often a fairly severe one, is the amount of greenery and shrubbery in your yard. Your pets like to investigate these areas and they are likely to contain colonies of mosquitoes resting over winter, but that are not afraid to attack animals if they are disturbed. A good mosquito control spray is often effective here.

Mosquitoes Do Not All Die In Winter

Mosquitoes do not all die in winter, but can hide in deep grass and under the leaves of shrubbery and trees around your home. Come spring they will attack you and your pets in their desperate hunt for blood. A small point here that many pet owners overlook: if you usually feed your animals outdoors in summer and fall, you may leave the bowls outside over winter.

These are common breeding areas for mosquitoes, so clean them out, or even better – take them indoors. All it takes is a few days: a dog bowl left out for 5 days in a warm climate can produce hundreds of biting mosquitoes.

Use a Non-Toxic Mosquito Spray

If you decide to use insecticide, usually in the form of a mosquito spray, make sure that it is not based on DEET. This substance can be dangerous to small animals. In fact, many are still unsure as to its safety for humans, so use a natural insecticide such as citronella, or picaridin which is deemed safer than DEET. You vet should be able to give you advice on the insecticide to use to protect your pets from mosquitoes.

Mosquitoes and pets do not mix well, and it is wise to take particular care with your dog or cat, or even your horse in warm weather when the insects are active. Check your yard and garden, and the area around your home for potential mosquito breeding areas.

Also check your kitchen, basement and garage because these can be very attractive areas of your home for mosquitoes over the winter. If you take proper care, then your pets should be as safe from mosquitoes as you are.